Royal Worcester Marks

Dates, Year Cyphers & Royal Worcester Marks on pottery, porcelain and Worcester figures.

Royal Worcester Marks were first placed on pottery and porcelain in 1862 but it was 1867 before it became common place.

Earlier Worcester Marks are rarely seen, and typically the crescent mark dates pieces to the Dr Wall period before 1783.

But pieces bearing the crescent mark are rare and usually the provence of specialist collectors.

Royal worcester Crescent Mark - Dr Wall Period

In the late 1700s Worcester were among the first to use the Bute shape for teabowls, tea cups and coffee cups.

The presence of the crescent mark dates these items to the Dr Wall period and they are all very similar in shape, size and decoration to those made in the same period by Caughley.

See our early worcester for sale section for examples of sparrow beak jugs, Bute cups and Dr Wall period pieces.

About Royal Worcester Marks

Dating Royal Worcester Marks

The Royal Worcester standard printed factory mark includes the number 51 in the centre which refers to the year 1751 when the Worcester Porcelain Company was founded by Dr. John Wall.

Royal Worcester Mark c1910

Early standard marks show the crown slightly above or perched on the circle and from 1876 the crown sits down onto the circle. The mark can appear in any colour.

In 1862 with the restructuring of the Royal Worcester company and the introduction of a new factory mark came the first of the new Worcester date coding sequences.

Royal Worcester Marks - 1887 YFrom 1862 until 1867 the last two numbers of the year would be used. These could be printed or impressed under the circle but like all impressed marks these could be difficult to see when they fill with glaze.

From 1867 until 1877 the code would either be the printed last two numbers of the year or a capital letter under the circle reprrsenting the date.

Royal Worcester Mark c1891 No Date Code

From 1877 the year number was dropped in favour of the letter system which carried on the same sequence.

In 1890 the capital letter changed to a small letter and started again but the sequence was only to last for one year.

Note: There was no ‘F’, ‘J’, or ‘Q’ used and the ‘O’ comes after the ‘Z’ in 1889.

In 1891 the mark changed, No date code was used but ‘Royal Worcester England’ appeared around the circle

Royal Worcester Marks and Date Codes

1867 – 67 or A
1868 – 68 or B
1869 – 69 or C
1870 – 70 or D
1871 – 71 or E
1872 – 72 or G
1873 – 73 or H
1874 – 74 or I
1875 – 75 or K
1876 – 76 or L
1877 – 77 or M
1878 – N
1879 – P
1880 – R
1881 – S
1882 – T
1883 – U
1884 – V
1885 – W
1886 – X
1887 – Y
1888 – Z
1889 – O
1890 – a
1892 – 1 dot on left of crown.
1893 – 1 dot each side of crown
1894 – 2 dots left 1 right
1895 – 2 dots left 2 right
1896 – 3 dots left 2 right
1897 – 3 dots left 3 right
1898 – 4 dots left 3 right
1899 – 4 dots left 4 right
1900 – 5 dots left 4 right
1901 – 5 dots left 5 right
1902 – 6 dots left 5 right
1903 – 6 dots left 6 right
1904 – plus 1 dot under circle
1905 – plus 2 dots under circle
1906 – plus 3 dots under circle
1907 – plus 4 dots under circle
1908 – plus 5 dots under circle
1909 – plus 6 dots under circle
1910 – plus 7 dots under circle
1911 – plus 8 dots under circle
1912 – plus 9 dots under circle
1913 – plus 10 dots under circle
1914 – plus 11 dots under circle
1915 – plus 12 dots under circle

About Royal Worcester Marks 1916 to 1948

Royal Worcester Marks - Asterisk Mark 1919

This dating system continued until 1915 when 24 dots are arranged around the standard printed mark.

The dots system was getting a little clumbersome so they were replaced by a single asterisk in 1916 which was then followed by a new dot sequence. All under the circle.

From 1916 a small star or asterisk appears below the Worcester mark …

Royal Worcester Marks - Three Circles 1940

  • 1916 * below the mark
  • 1917 * and one dot
  • 1918 * and two dots

However on some pieces the old dot sequence continued for a few years.

It being easier and cheaper to put an extra dot on existing copper plates than make new ones.

This continued until the dots became un-manageable and then Worcester marks changed to different shapes, all printed beneath the circle.

1916 – * under circle
1917 – * plus 1 dot
1918 – * plus 2 dots
1919 – * plus 3 dots
1920 – * plus 4 dots
1921 – * plus 5 dots
1922 – * plus 6 dots
1923 – * plus 7 dots
1924 – * plus 8 dots
1925 – * plus 9 dots
1926 – * plus 10 dots
1927 – * plus 11 dots
1928 – open square
1929 – open diamond
1930 – division sign
1931 – 2 linked circles
1932 – 3 linked circles
1933 – 3 circles 1 dot
1934 – 3 circles 2 dots
1935 – 3 circles 3 dots
1936 – 3 circles 4 dots
1937 – 3 circles 5 dots
1938 – 3 circles 6 dots
1939 – 3 circles 7 dots
1940 – 3 circles 8 dots
1941 – 3 circles 9 dots
1942 – 3 circles 10 dots
1943 – 3 circles 11 dots
1944 – 3 circles 12 dots
1945 – 3 circles 13 dots
1946 – 3 circles 14 dots
1947 – 3 circles 15 dots
1948 – 3 circles 16 dots

Dating Royal Worcester Marks from 1949 to 1963

Worcester continued this sequence until 1941 when there were 9 dots and the triple circle mark.

Royal Worcester Marks - W mark 1956

From c1942 the vast majority of factory stamps were printed in black with the following codes below the mark.

  • 1942-48 no dating system was used
  • 1949 V
  • 1950 W
  • 1951 W
  • 1952 W
  • 1953 W

In 1949 the various asterisk, square, diamond and circle shapes changed to letters and then quickly back to letters and dot sequences.

These continued until 1963 but their use was rather inconsistent and a great many pieces produced at this time are un-dated.

1949 – V
1950 – W
1951 – W plus 1 dot
1952 – W plus 2 dots
1953 – W plus 3 dots
1954 – W plus 4 dots
1955 – W plus 5 dots
1956 – W plus 6 dots
1957 – W plus 7 dots
1958 – W plus 8 dots
1959 – W plus 9 dots
1960 – W plus 10 dots
1961 – W plus 11 dots
1962 – W plus 12 dots
1963 – W plus 13 dots

Dating Royal Worcester Marks from 1963 on

After 1963 no Worcester dating system is used but patterns are all named and bear the date that they were first introduced.

Worcester Marks - R and dots for 1959

This continued until 1963 when 13 dots are arranged around the W.

After 1956 the letter W was nearly always substituted with a letter R in a circle, i.e. 1959 = R or W under the circle with 9 dots.

From 1966 no date coding system was used, but on tableware the year the pattern was introduced is stated next to the pattern name.

In 1974 the current format of factory stamp was adopted. The date included is the year of introduction of the design, not the date of manufacture.

In April 1988 a system of year of manufacture identification that fitted with that used by Spode was introduced and an M within a diamond was incorporated below the factory mark.

In January 1989 new factory stamps were phased in with N in place of the M and soon afterward black numbers were introduced.

These numbers were replaced with grey ones in August 1989 to reduce their visual impact.

January 1990 a new system introduced a printed grey lithographer identification number plus a suffix to signify the year.
Printed In Grey
1990 – 39-0
1991 – 39-1
1992 – 39-2
1993 – 39-3
1994 – 39-4
1995 – 39-5
1996 – 39-6
Printed In White
2000 – 39-00
2001 – 39-01
2002 – 39-02
2003 – 39-03

In 1990 all factory stamps reverted

to the R form under the mark.

The R signifying registered.

Royal Worcester Marks - W mark 1956

 

Royal Worcester Tableware Marks

At some point during the 1960s it became standard practice for the Royal Worcester factory to name all their tableware and dinner services. The Evesham and Royal Garden patterns being just two examples.

Prior to this date named sets were uncommon, although there were some the majority of early named patterns were given the name in more recent times.

Rather than use names the Worcester factory relied on pattern numbers which were hand written in script, rather than stamped.

  • In the 1860s when Royal Worcester was formed from the earlier Kerr and Binns, tableware was given a simple four figure pattern number which carried on from those used by both Kerr and Binns and the Chamberlain factory Worcester marks.Numbers begin with 7247 in mid-1862 and continued to 9685 in August 1876.
  • From 1876 they changed to numbers prefixed with a ‘B’ and these ran until B 1081 which was produced in May 1883.
  • From 1883 all new tableware patterns were prefixed with a ‘W’ which started with ‘W1’ and contimued until at least ‘W9978’ which was probably produced around mid-1913.
  • In 1913 prefixes then changed to a ‘C’ and the numbers started again and continued up to ‘C3390’ which was first produced in 1928.
  • From 1928 all tableware patterns were prefixed with a ‘Z’ which continued until after 1962.

Records of Worcester tableware marks were only published for the more expensive hand painted patterns which appeared randomly throughout the numbering sequence.

These records detail tableware type, the decoration, and the painter, but the simpler apprentice sets and transfer printed sets appear to have no clear record of what each set looks like.