12 posts tagged amarks

Coalport Porcelain & Dating Coalport Marks

The Coalport porcelain manufactory was a market leading pottery throughout the 1800s, it produced a staggering range of porcelain products of all shapes and types. Seemingly Coalport was named Coalport because of the coal that was transferred from canal boats to river vessels in the Coalbrook Dale area. The Coalport pottery utilised a great variety of Coalport marks over its lengthy existence as well as early Coalbrook Dale marks and mock Sevres & Chelsea marks. Very early ... Continue Reading

What are Antique Marks?

Exactly what are antique marks and china marks. What can they tell you? Watching the experts at antique roadshows or on auction house valuation days, you probably wonder just how they get so much information about a teacup, vase or a piece of silver simply by turning the item upside down. The fact is the markings that are stamped, painted or impressed on the underside of most antique items can help you tell a great deal about a piece other than just who made it. The name of the pottery ... Continue Reading

Royal Worcester Marks

Dates, Year Cyphers & Royal Worcester Marks on pottery, porcelain and Worcester figures. Royal Worcester Marks were first placed on pottery and porcelain in 1862 but it was 1867 before it became common place. Earlier Worcester Marks are rarely seen, and typically the crescent mark dates pieces to the Dr Wall period before 1783. But pieces bearing the crescent mark are rare and usually the provence of specialist collectors. In the late 1700s Worcester were among the first to use ... Continue Reading

Wedgwood Marks

An illustrated list of Wedgwood Marks presented in chronological order An easy to use chronological list of Wedgwood marks to help the Wedgwood collector, who is faced with many imitators, to date genuine Wedgwood antiques. Fortunately for the collector, Josiah Wedgwood was the first potter of note to mark his goods with his own name. Unlike the easily copied potters marks used by other manufacturers, for example the crossed swords mark used by Meissen; the Sevres double L mark, or the ... Continue Reading

Moorcroft Marks

A Guide to Moorcroft Marks and identifying dates for Moorcroft Pottery. The moorcroft pottery has mainly remained in the hands of one family since its creation and Moorcroft mark changes have been quite few. The main Moorcroft marks changed as William Moorcroft moved from Macintyre & Co, at the end of the 19th century and then when Walter Moorcroft took over from his father. The Moorcroft marks remained steady until the modern owners instigated a system of dating and then again until ... Continue Reading

Derby Marks

Early Derby Marks and newer Royal Crown Derby base marks. Derby marks are many but most follow the same theme, with a cypher surmounted by a crown. Dating early Derby is slightly more difficult than the more modern Royal Crown Derby, but dating Derby porcelain is much easier than many of the early English porcelain factories. (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); Derby porcelain was produced at three main factories. Those being ... Nottingham Road ... Continue Reading

Meissen Marks

Antique Meissen Marks and the blue crossed swords mark imitators. Not all blue crossed swords marks are genuine Meissen marks. Knowing what to look for and the dates that are relevant to each Meissen mark can help you avoid buying imitation Meissen porcelain. You should remember that the marks detailed below are mostly drawn by hand and that slight variations in the format occur and the mark only supports the source and doesn't testify to it. The true test of an antique Meissen ... Continue Reading

Doulton Marks

Royal Doulton Marks, base marks, pattern codes and trade marks. The Doulton marks are many and varied but most follow the same theme. Dating Royal Doulton products from their Doulton marks means you sometimes have to check very carefully. Factors other than the Doulton mark can help in more accurate dating, particularly pattern names and numbers and date codes or artists monograms. Between 1878 and 1882, Henry and James Doulton acquired a major interest in the Pinder Bourne factory in ... Continue Reading

Noritake China: History & Marks

Guide to Noritake China & Dating Noritake Marks - Antique Marks Noritake china production began around 1876 here we take a brief look at Noritake China & Noritake Marks The Morimura Brothers formed the Noritake company in Tokyo and opened an export office in New York. They initially produced a full range of china marked with the Nippon mark and also sold china in-the-white, ie; blanks for decorating by outside agencies and decorators, thus the quality of the earlier finished ... Continue Reading

Hummel Marks

Hummel Marks from TMK-1 to TMK-8 The Crown Mark, The Full Bee, The Stylised Bee, The Missing Bee and other Hummel Marks. The first three hummel figurines Puppy Love, Little Fiddler and Bookworm were marked FF15, FF16 and FF17. When they were first created the figurine series designation or mold numbers had not yet been set up. When Goebel reached a licensing agreement with Sister Maria and the Convent in 1935, the early figurines were then marked HUM1, HUM2 and HUM3. The Sister Maria ... Continue Reading

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