43 posts tagged makers mark

Antiques Collection: Pair of Rosenthal Art Deco Vases

With decoration depicting four Dragons rising from a stormy sea, this fine pair of Rosenthal Art Deco Vases are absolutely stunning. The Dragons are embellished and surrounded with honeycomb pattern gilding and the large flared rims have gilded edges and ornately patterned borders. A very collectable pair of Rosenthal vases. Continue Reading

The Antiques Collection: Royal Doulton Saltglaze Tyg

The Antique Marks Collection contains a very good Royal Doulton Saltglaze Tyg of good proportion and having three foxhound handles. Signed Ada Dennis and dating to c1858 Continue Reading

Doulton Marks

Royal Doulton Marks, base marks, pattern codes and trade marks. The Doulton marks are many and varied but most follow the same theme. Dating Royal Doulton products from their Doulton marks means you sometimes have to check very carefully. Factors other than the Doulton mark can help in more accurate dating, particularly pattern names and numbers and date codes or artists monograms. Between 1878 and 1882, Henry and James Doulton acquired a major interest in the Pinder Bourne factory in ... Continue Reading

Sevres Marks

A guide to the Sevres Marks including the Double L and Double C marks The Sevres double L mark was introduced in 1751 and in 1753 year letters were added to all Sevres marks The Sevres Porcelain year cyphers began with an 'A' in 1753 and continued until 'Z' In 1777 these then moved to a 'AA' in 1778 and continued to 'PP' in 1793. After 1793 the double L mark was replaced by the RF mark, which stood for République Française. This ocurred as the revolutionaries had overthrown the ... Continue Reading

Hummel Marks & Markings

Hummel Marks from TMK-1 to TMK-8 The Crown Mark, The Full Bee, The Stylised Bee, The Missing Bee, and other Hummel Marks and Hummel Markings. The first three hummel figurines Puppy Love, Little Fiddler and Bookworm were marked FF15, FF16, and FF17. When they were first created the figurine series designation or mold numbers had not yet been set up. When Goebel reached a licensing agreement with Sister Maria and the Convent in 1935, the early figurines were then marked HUM1, HUM2, and ... Continue Reading

Antiques Collection: Royal Worcester Prismatic Enamels Vase

From the Antique Marks Collection we have a fine Royal Worcester Prismatic Enamels Vase with original cover. Featuring photos and detailed images of Worcester Marks. Prismatic enamel wares are Continue Reading

Chelsea Porcelain Marks

Chelsea Porcelain Marks including the triangle period, the red anchor period and the gold anchor period. Well before the Derby Porcelain acquisition Chelsea's reputation for quality products had been envied the world over. (adsbygoogle = window.adsbygoogle || []).push({}); And a great many rival companies sought to capitalise on that reputation by marking their own wares with a mark similar to the Chelsea anchor mark. The Chelsea Porcelain Marks and particularly the anchor mark were ... Continue Reading

Chelsea Porcelain Factory

The history of the Chelsea Porcelain company, its products and its anchor mark periods. The Chelsea porcelain factory was founded in 1743 by two Frenchmen; Charles Gouyn a goldsmith and Nicholas Sprimont a silversmith. The Chelsea porcelain manufactory was the first important porcelain manufactory in England Its early soft-paste porcelain products were aimed at the aristocratic market. The first director Nicholas Sprimont was a silversmith by trade, but few documents survive to put ... Continue Reading

Antiques Collection: Ernst Wahliss Porcelain Centerpiece c1897

The Ernst Wahliss porcelain manufactory was founded in Trnovany in the Czech Republic in 1863. This stunning centerpiece dates to circa 1897 and features delicate work depicting figures entwined in fishing nets. It bears the Ernst Wahliss crown mark used from 1897 to 1906 Continue Reading

Art Deco Jewellery

Collecting Original 1920's and 30's Art Deco Jewellery Art Deco Jewellery is a product of the age of the flapper, Jazz and the machine age and jewellery of the 1920's and 30's was in thrall to geometry: circles, arcs, squares, rectangles and triangles. Materials used ranged from rubies, gold, and pearls to plastic, chrome and steel. Platinum was the new luxury metal and was used with opaque stones like coral, jade, onyx and lapis lazuli. Art Deco costume jewelry became ever more popular and ... Continue Reading

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