43 posts tagged makers mark

Coalport Porcelain & Dating Coalport Marks

The Coalport porcelain manufactory was a market leading pottery throughout the 1800s, it produced a staggering range of porcelain products of all shapes and types. Seemingly Coalport was named Coalport because of the coal that was transferred from canal boats to river vessels in the Coalbrook Dale area. The Coalport pottery utilised a great variety of Coalport marks over its lengthy existence as well as early Coalbrook Dale marks and mock Sevres & Chelsea marks. Very early ... Continue Reading

Antique Values – What to look out for when valuing antiques

Assessing an antiques value involves a lot more than examining a price list. Antiques experts will use a price guide as the starting point in the antique appraisal and valuation process but also include a host of other factors to determine an antiques true value Continue Reading

Antiques Collection: Gerbing & Stephan Majolica Vase c1890

Beginning as Schiller & Gerbing in 1829 and eventually becoming Gerbing & Stephan in 1861, this once significant ceramics company produced some superb Majolica pottery. The battle scene vase in our Antiques collection is a wonderful example bearing Gerbing & Stephan marks used between 1861 and 1900. They show a very clear 'G&St.' mark. Continue Reading

Dating Wade Marks

Keys to Dating Wade pottery and identifying Wade Marks Wade is historically famous for the introduction of the very collectible Wade Whimsies and the, almost as well known but not as popular today, Wade Gurgle Jugs and Decanters. Originally founded in 1810, today Wade Pottery produces branded decanters for Scots Whisky makers including Bells, Chivas Regal's Royal Salute, Grouse, Glenfiddich and Glenlivet. George WADE (1864-1938), was born in Tunstall, Stoke-on-Trent. His father was a ... Continue Reading

Antiques Collection: Rare Worcester Pot Pourri

Few things provide an antique collector with more pleasure than finding an antique they really like. This wonderful little Royal Worcester pot pourri bowl was the perfect addition to our antiques collection and sits beautifully among the other pieces of antique Worcester porcelain we own. It's been beautifully decorated in the Royal Worcester Persian style using a palette of muted shades of green and peach and bears all the right Worcester marks. Plus it came at just the right price. Continue Reading

What are Antique Marks?

Exactly what are antique marks and china marks. What can they tell you? Watching the experts at antique roadshows or on auction house valuation days, you probably wonder just how they get so much information about a teacup, vase or a piece of silver simply by turning the item upside down. The fact is the markings that are stamped, painted or impressed on the underside of most antique items can help you tell a great deal about a piece other than just who made it. The name of the pottery ... Continue Reading

Wedgwood Marks

An illustrated list of Wedgwood Marks presented in chronological order An easy to use chronological list of Wedgwood marks to help the Wedgwood collector, who is faced with many imitators, to date genuine Wedgwood antiques. Fortunately for the collector, Josiah Wedgwood was the first potter of note to mark his goods with his own name. Unlike the easily copied potters marks used by other manufacturers, for example the crossed swords mark used by Meissen; the Sevres double L mark, or the ... Continue Reading

Moorcroft Marks

A Guide to Moorcroft Marks and identifying dates for Moorcroft Pottery. The moorcroft pottery has mainly remained in the hands of one family since its creation and Moorcroft mark changes have been quite few. The main Moorcroft marks changed as William Moorcroft moved from Macintyre & Co, at the end of the 19th century and then when Walter Moorcroft took over from his father. The Moorcroft marks remained steady until the modern owners instigated a system of dating and then again until ... Continue Reading

Dresden Porcelain

A brief look at Dresden Porcelain and the Dresden Crown mark. Dresden Porcelain is often confused with Meissen porcelain, but only because Meissen blanks were used initially. However, Dresden porcelain refers more to an artistic movement than a particular porcelain company In fact, several competing ceramic studios emerged under the Dresden umbrella, particularly in the Saxony capital in response to the rise of romanticism during the 19th century. Dresden was an important centre ... Continue Reading

Paris Porcelain Vases by Bourdoir and Bloch

Paris Porcelain is to France what Dresden Porcelain is to Germany. Porcelain by a variety of makers from a region rather than one maker. In this case Porcelain de Paris is also as good if not sometimes better than Dresden, Meissen or Sevres porcelain and is certainly a collectible to look out for Continue Reading